tomorrow is going to be better

mtv:

one maze, one million dollars. 

which group of runners will win the million dollar maze TONIGHT at 11p? http://on.mtv.com/1qhp8f8  

"I’m such a baseball guy over everything else. Even when they’re not playing for the six months out of the year, it’s all I pay attention to and it’s all I care about. My Mets are insanely precious to me. I watch every single game. Even if I get home at 2 AM, I will put on the game. It’s crazy."

file under:
#alzheimers
#alzheimer's

bowtruckle:

hula-hope:

My grandpa has Alzheimer’s so he has no idea who my grandma is but everyday for the last three or four months he brings her in flowers from their garden and asks her to run away with him and be his wife and everyday she says she already is and everyday the smile my grandpa gets on his face is the most beautiful heartfelt thing I have ever seen.

NO

PLEASE STOP ROMANTICIZING ALZHEIMER’S

Alzheimer’s can be fascinating. It can revel truths about life and humanity in a way nothing else can. But do not mistake the reality of it as anything less than truly horrific in a deeply personal way.

Imagine spending a whole lifetime making deep friendships, falling in love, learning new things, having inside jokes, adventures, successes, failures, new beginnings. Alzheimer’s makes your whole life disappear like it never happened. All the things you achieved, the people you know, disappear.

Yes, there is a period where interesting or amusing stories often come out, where victims only remember particular things. Incidentally, there was point in the disease where my Grandma no longer remembered any of her children, but knew all the lyrics to any song you played from her youth.

However, no one talks about the period the comes after that. Eventually the mind decays so fully that you are basically an empty shell, who can no longer, eat, walk, wash, or wipe. It’s a slow processes that can deeply hurt loved ones. In states without “the right to die,” you can only sit by watch the person you love decay. They will be there, often physically normal, but gone. I remember for years my mom would pray for her mom to die. Which sounds cruel, be trust me, it was out of pure love.

there’s also the part where your grandpa is there every day but your grandma can’t remember and she gets mad when he walks in because she thinks he’s abandoned her for months.

"lauren, you’re getting so big, how old are you?"

or when she thinks her youngest son (who is now in his fifties) has crawled away and she’s hysterical because she thinks her baby is dead in a ditch and this happens every night.

"my girl, you’re so pretty, how old are you now?"

or the part at the end of a good day where her mind shuts down and she thinks everyone is out to get her. and she has forgotten it’s her birthday. and she has forgotten that she likes chocolate. and she has forgotten that eating chocolate ice cream in a cafeteria at 4pm is a thing that we’re doing to celebrate her life, and we’re not even sure why we’re still doing this because it’s not for her benefit and it’s not for ours either. ritual, i guess.

"mon petit, look how big you are, what grade are you in?"

or the day you walk into an alzheimer’s ward and a stranger is pleading with you because she doesn’t think she needs to be there, that’s she’s not crazy and someone has trapped her in this place and the only reason you’re even sitting in the hallway is because your own grandma had a meltdown and you’re waiting for someone to unlock the door so you can get out but it’s also locking your grandma in, and you hate it but it’s not like anyone is capable of taking care of your grandma because she needs professional help.

"leila, i haven’t seen you in years, what are you doing here?"

on the way home, we talk about the facility’s therapy dog. 


Dylan O’Brien at The Maze Runner screening in Toronto

Dylan O’Brien at The Maze Runner screening in Toronto
file under:
#amy poehler

amypoehler:

…,-―-、 (k)ノノ))リ) ノ人゚ヮ゚ノヽつ━☆・* ⊂  ノ    ・゜+.  しーJ   °。+ *´¨)         .· ´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)          (¸.·´ (¸.·’* ☆Amy Poehler has a special message 4 u

amypoehler:

…,-―-、
(k)ノノ))リ)
ノ人゚ヮ゚ノヽつ━☆・*
⊂  ノ    ・゜+.
 しーJ   °。+ *´¨)
        .· ´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)
         (¸.·´ (¸.·’* ☆Amy Poehler has a special message 4 u

meladoodle:

someone is trying to convince me that the name ‘glen’ is short for ‘glenjamin’ and i cant stop laughing

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been overweight all my life. But I broke up with my boyfriend last year, and things weren’t going well, so it got worse and worse. I’d try to diet, but I’d eat something that I wasn’t supposed to. I’d try to go to the gym, but I’d leave early. I was trying to lose weight because I felt like I needed to be a different person. But time has passed now, and I think I’m approaching weight loss with a much more positive attitude. I know that I can be happy without losing weight. Sure, I wish I could wear prettier clothes. I wish I could take a photograph without my face looking like a football. But I know that I’m not my weight. And it’s hard to come to that conclusion. You really have to battle to separate your self-image from your weight. Because weight is always the first thing that somebody sees. Somebody will see you after a few years, and their first comment is about the weight you’ve put on. Maybe I’ve become a better person these last few years. Maybe I’ve been a great friend to someone. Maybe I’ve read a lot of books and become smarter. Maybe the reason I’ve put on weight is that I’ve got a great job that can be stressful and doesn’t leave me time to go to the gym."
(New Delhi, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been overweight all my life. But I broke up with my boyfriend last year, and things weren’t going well, so it got worse and worse. I’d try to diet, but I’d eat something that I wasn’t supposed to. I’d try to go to the gym, but I’d leave early. I was trying to lose weight because I felt like I needed to be a different person. But time has passed now, and I think I’m approaching weight loss with a much more positive attitude. I know that I can be happy without losing weight. Sure, I wish I could wear prettier clothes. I wish I could take a photograph without my face looking like a football. But I know that I’m not my weight. And it’s hard to come to that conclusion. You really have to battle to separate your self-image from your weight. Because weight is always the first thing that somebody sees. Somebody will see you after a few years, and their first comment is about the weight you’ve put on. Maybe I’ve become a better person these last few years. Maybe I’ve been a great friend to someone. Maybe I’ve read a lot of books and become smarter. Maybe the reason I’ve put on weight is that I’ve got a great job that can be stressful and doesn’t leave me time to go to the gym."

(New Delhi, India)

danielradcliffedaily:

"I have this stupid rule that’s really an excuse to burn money, which is: if I ever see a book which I think that I might never see again, or if I’m suddenly interested in it, and I think “Oh well, I might never ever see this book again and be interested in it at the same time,” I just have to buy it then and there in the hope that one day I will get around to it or find something useful about it. I have bought a lot of books that I will never read that way."  Daniel Radcliffe for Mental Floss

file under:
#holland roden

file under:
#lauren

Dylan and Kaya at Seacrest Studios (September 11, 2014)

file under:
#teen wolf

"We’re not really afraid of your little fireflies."

brightwalldarkroom:

"There are a handful of shows I ask everyone I talk to about television if they have seen: The Wire, Mad Men, Friday Night Lights. But when I ask them if they’ve watched and loved Friday Night Lights, what I mean is are you my kind of person? Are you all heart? Are you bothered by this 21st-century lack of earnestness, our abundance of irony? Do you wonder how we forgive and coach ourselves to do better? How we can strive again for valor and loyalty and daring and redemption? 
I fear we are defaulting to needless negativity as some kind of social currency. But Friday Night Lights is the most earnest show I’ve ever watched. Not sentimental, however: these characters aren’t perfect. In fact, this show is incredibly astute at allowing humans to have stratums of complexity: to have character and occasionally act without it, and then to live in the mire of their own dumb choices. Do I adore Coach? Yes. Do I think, as Tammy says, he is a molder of men and a husband of fierce devotion? Absolutely. Do I also think he can also be a self-involved, sexist prick who values his career over his wife’s? No question.
Regardless of the scale of the battle, the stakes in Friday Night Lights are rarely phony or contrived. It’s about winning games, sure, but its scope far exceeds that. This is a show that tests and reflects commitment not just on the football field, but back in the locker room. And in Street’s rehab room, and Saracen’s grandmother’s living room, and Julie’s bedroom, and eventually out to Luke’s farm and Tim’s prison and Tammy’s dream in Philadelphia. This commitment is not about obligation, but something more sacred. Duty. The hidden gale that blusters and grows within us and makes us yearn to give someone else exactly what they need.”
—Erica Cantoni on Friday Night Lights (Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #14, July 2014)

brightwalldarkroom:

"There are a handful of shows I ask everyone I talk to about television if they have seen: The Wire, Mad Men, Friday Night Lights. But when I ask them if they’ve watched and loved Friday Night Lights, what I mean is are you my kind of person? Are you all heart? Are you bothered by this 21st-century lack of earnestness, our abundance of irony? Do you wonder how we forgive and coach ourselves to do better? How we can strive again for valor and loyalty and daring and redemption? 

I fear we are defaulting to needless negativity as some kind of social currency. But Friday Night Lights is the most earnest show I’ve ever watched. Not sentimental, however: these characters aren’t perfect. In fact, this show is incredibly astute at allowing humans to have stratums of complexity: to have character and occasionally act without it, and then to live in the mire of their own dumb choices. Do I adore Coach? Yes. Do I think, as Tammy says, he is a molder of men and a husband of fierce devotion? Absolutely. Do I also think he can also be a self-involved, sexist prick who values his career over his wife’s? No question.

Regardless of the scale of the battle, the stakes in Friday Night Lights are rarely phony or contrived. It’s about winning games, sure, but its scope far exceeds that. This is a show that tests and reflects commitment not just on the football field, but back in the locker room. And in Street’s rehab room, and Saracen’s grandmother’s living room, and Julie’s bedroom, and eventually out to Luke’s farm and Tim’s prison and Tammy’s dream in Philadelphia. This commitment is not about obligation, but something more sacred. Duty. The hidden gale that blusters and grows within us and makes us yearn to give someone else exactly what they need.”

—Erica Cantoni on Friday Night Lights (Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #14, July 2014)

file under:
#parks and rec

smallstrawhat:

i wish aziz ansari as Tom Haverford would have been the one to announce the new apple watch because that’s such a him idea. (tom haverford voice) It’s a watch…. *finger guns* that makes phonecalls. It’s a watch… *finger guns* that lets you control the temperature of any room. I call it (long pause, looks straight into the camera) Watch the Throne.

T H E M E